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Guidance
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Types of Courses



Academic Courses and Applied Courses in Grades 9 and 10
Academic and applied courses set high expectations for all students.  Academic courses focus on the essential concepts of the discipline and also explore related concepts.  Academic courses develop students' knowledge and skills by emphasizing theoretical, abstract applications of the essential concepts and incorporating practical applications as appropriate.  Applied courses also focus on the essential concepts of the discipline, but develop students' knowledge and skills by emphasizing practical, concrete applications of these concepts and incorporating theoretical applications as appropriate.  Academic and applied courses differ in the balance between essential concepts and additional material, and in the balance between theory and application.

Open Courses in Grades 9 and 10
An open course comprises a set of expectations that is suitable for all students at a given grade level. These courses are designed to provide students with a broad educational base that will prepare them for their studies in Grades 11 and 12 and for productive participation in society.

Grade 11 and 12 Destination Courses
The four destination-related types of courses are university preparation courses, university/college preparation courses, college preparation courses, and workplace preparation courses. At a minimum, school boards must offer one course in each of these four types in Grades 11 and 12 in the following subjects:  English, mathematics, science, and technological education.

Open courses and transfer courses are also available in Grades 11 and 12.  Open courses are appropriate for all students and are not linked to any specific postsecondary destination.  Transfer courses are designed primarily to provide the content needed by students who wish to transfer from one type of course to another as a result of changes in their post secondary plans.

University Preparation Courses
University preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for university programs.  All university preparation courses will be based on rigorous provincial curriculum expectations and will emphasize the development of both independent research skills and independent learning skills.  Students will also be required to demonstrate that they have developed these skills.

University/College Preparation Courses
University/college preparation courses include content that is relevant for both university and college programs.  These courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for specific university and college programs.  All university/college preparation courses will be based on rigorous provincial curriculum expectations and will emphasize the development of both independent research skills and independent learning skills.  Students will also be required to demonstrate that they have developed these skills.

College Preparation Courses
College preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for college programs.   All college preparation courses will be based on rigorous provincial curriculum expectations and will emphasize the development of both independent research skills and independent learning skills. Courses will also require students to demonstrate that they have developed these skills.

Workplace Preparation Courses
Workplace preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need for direct entry into the workplace or for admission to apprenticeship programs and other training programs offered in the community.   Cooperative education and work experience placements within the community are important components of workplace preparation courses. Workplace preparation courses will be based on rigorous provincial curriculum expectations and will emphasize the development of generic employment skills, as well as independent research and learning skills.  Students will be required to demonstrate that they have developed these skills.  Workplace preparation courses in particular should also promote and stress the importance of lifelong learning.

Transfer Courses   (Grades 10 and 11)
A transfer course is a partial-credit course (0.25 or 0.50 credit) that bridges the gap between courses of two different types in the same subject.  Students who revise their educational and career goals and who wish to change from one type of course in a particular subject but lack the prerequisite course may do so by taking a transfer course.  Transfer courses enable students to achieve the expectations not covered in one course type but required for entry into another.  Talk to your guidance teacher/counsellor for more information.

Locally Developed Courses
Locally developed courses are courses that meet educational needs not met by provincial curriculum policy documents.  The  locally developed grade 9 and 10 courses include grade 9 math, science, and English, and grade 10 math and English.  The three grade 9 locally developed core courses (math, science, and English) are referred to as "Essential" courses and are considered compulsory courses.  All other grade 9 and 10 locally developed courses are considered optional courses.

Specialized Programs
Specialized programs provide students with a particular curriculum focus to assist them in meeting diploma requirements and in making the transition to post secondary destinations (i.e., university, college, apprenticeship programs, and the workplace).  Students who do not have a specific career in mind but who wish to pursue their studies at the post secondary level could take a university preparation or college preparation program.  Students who wish to go directly into the work force could take a school-work transition program.

*Additional information on courses of study offered at JDSS and curriculum documents is available by contacting the principal.

PROCEDURES FOR STUDENTS WHO WISH TO CHANGE COURSE TYPES   

Some students, after successfully completing a certain type of course, may change their educational goals and, as a consequence, may need to take compulsory and optional credit courses of a different type or level from those they initially chose. Although students enrolled in one type of course may enrol in a different type of course in a subsequent year, changing course types becomes more difficult as students advance through the system, or in situations involving courses that have prerequisites.

It is recommended that students who wish to switch course types from grade 9 to 10 (applied to academic or academic to applied) take the crossover materials for the appropriate subject area. These materials are available on the Internet at www.ilc.org

A student wishing to change course types between Grades 10 and 11 and/or Grades 11 and 12 may, for example:
  • take a transfer course that will bridge the gap between course types;
  • take a course of another type (e.g., academic) that will satisfy the prerequisites for a course in a higher grade (e.g., a university preparation course) that the student wishes to take;
  • take a summer course or undertake independent study to achieve the uncompleted expectations that are required to enter the new program.
Note:  Students wishing to change a course should consult with their guidance counsellor.


COURSE OFFERINGS  - SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES

The options available to students who wish to consider alternative methods of earning credits to enrolling in courses offered in their secondary school include:

Correspondence Courses:  The Independent Learning Center offers secondary school credit courses for individuals who wish to work independently towards the secondary school diploma.  If you are 16 to 19 years old, you must provide a "Date of Leaving" letter from your last secondary school and a copy of your most recent Ontario Student Transcript.  Contact your guidance counsellor for information on the Independent Learning Centre Student Guide and/or the ILC website at www.ilc.org

Independent Study:  A teacher may allow a student to work toward a credit through independent study in which course components are assigned, resources are suggested, achievement is evaluated and the total work involved is equivalent to that expected in the time scheduled for the course. Courses delivered through the Independent Learning Centre may form part of independent study.

Private Study:  Students may be permitted to take one or more courses where a) the student is deemed to have valid reasons for not attending classes or, b) the school does not offer the course. The school must be willing to monitor the student's progress and evaluate the student's work.  ILC courses may form part of the private study program.  A student wishing to apply for private study must submit an application as early in the school year as possible and no later than the first school day in September for a course to be completed by January 31 or the first school day in February for a course completed by June 30.

Continuing Education:  This involves the provision of credit and non credit courses for students who wish to study part time or full time for a short term outside the secondary school program.  Courses may include evening, summer school, daytime classes, and adult basic education courses.  See your guidance counsellor for further details.

Summer School:  Summer school courses may be available for students who wish to earn additional credits, retake courses they have not successfully completed, improve achievement in a course or to take transfer courses.  See your guidance counsellor for further details.


Last Modified: Jun 01, 2017
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